History of SELF-TAUGHT
& OUTSIDER ART

Sarah Glennie and Michael Tooby, foreword in Two Painters: Works by Alfred Wallis and James Dixon, exhibition catalogue (1999)

As the emphasis in art turned away from imitation towards expression during the twentieth century, the work of untrained or ‘primitive’ artists became an important influence for Modernist painters and was actively sought out. Artists looked for a directness and purity of expression in the work of untrained artists and celebrated the apparent lack of decision-making or analysis in the work. For example, Picasso and Braque looked to the work of Henri ‘le Douanier’ Rousseau in France at the beginning of the century, and later Dubuffet actively collect ‘L’Art Brut’ or ‘Outsider’ art. Ben Nicholson once remarked of Alfred Wallis, "One finds the influences one is looking for."


Excerpt source:

Sarah Glennie and Michael Tooby, foreword in Two Painters: Works by Alfred Wallis and James Dixon, exhibition catalogue (London: Merrell Holberton Publishers Limited in association with Irish Museum of Modern Art and Tate Gallery St. Ives, 1999)) 6-7.


Alfred Wallis
Port St. Ives, c. 1939
oil and pencil on cardboard
British

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Consuelo "Chelo" González Amezcua
Anthony J. Petullo
Self-Taught and Outsider Art:
The Anthony Petullo
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2001ISBN 0-2520266-6-7
University of Illinois Press